Performing this Week

Liang Wang, oboe
Liang Wang, oboe

Marc Neikrug, piano
Marc Neikrug, piano

Daniel Phillips, violin
Daniel Phillips, violin

Anne-Marie McDermott, piano
Anne-Marie McDermott, piano

Giora Schmidt, violin
Giora Schmidt, violin

Lily Francis, viola
Lily Francis, viola

Nicholas Canellakis, cello
Nicholas Canellakis, cello

Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival

The Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival

Summer 2010 — Week 5

Some rarities and great surprises can be found in Week 5 of our Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival broadcasts. Daniel Phillips and Anne-Marie McDermott play a short, little-known duo for violin and piano by Anton Bruckner called Abendklänge, or evening sounds... Giora Schmidt, Jennifer Frautschi, Lily Francis, Sophie Shao, and Nicholas Canellakis play music by Walter Braunfels. His String Quintet in F-sharp Minor, Op. 63 was composed in 1945 when the composer was living in internal exile in Germany; he continued to create, although the Nazis had banned his music.

The program begins with Marc's collaboration with Liang Wang, and a set of two brief instrumental song portraits for oboe and piano. Benjamin Britten wrote these "Two Insect Pieces" in 1935 for the oboist Sylvia Spencer, who had played in early performances of his Phantasy Quartet. The first performances of "The Grasshopper "and "The Wasp" did not take place during Britten's lifetime; it wasn't until 1979 that they were performed by Janet Craxton and Margot Wright as part of a memorial concert for Sylvia Spencer.

Welcome to the home of items rescued from the "cutting room floor," and other related tangents found along the way to creating the radio programs. Scroll below to listen to excerpts from Kerry Frumkin and Marc Neikrug's conversation about this week's program, and to explore other "web extras."

Thanks for stopping by,
Louise Frank
Series Producer

Benjamin Britten around 1935, the year he composed the Two Insect Pieces. (Thanks to Boosey & Hawkes)

Benjamin Britten around 1935, the year he composed the Two Insect Pieces. (Thanks to Boosey & Hawkes)

BENJAMIN BRITTEN
Two Insect Pieces (1935)

  • "The Grasshopper"
  • "The Wasp"

Liang Wang, oboe; Marc Neikrug, piano

A Britten rarity: Two Insect Pieces of 1935
A Britten rarity: Two Insect Pieces of 1935

 

Liang Wang joined the New York Philharmonic in September 2006 as Principal Oboe
Liang Wang joined the New York Philharmonic in September 2006 as Principal Oboe (image from liangoboe.com)

 

"This was simply fun." Marc tells Kerry about the Two Insect Pieces of Benjamin Britten.

 

"Benjamin Britten was born November 22nd, 1913 in the house at 21, Kirkley Cliff Road, Lowestoft in Suffolk." Take a photo tour through this composer's life with your guide at the excellent classical music blog, On An Overgrown Path.

Much can be learned about Benjamin Britten at the Britten-Pears Foundation website.

Explore an animated timeline of Britten's life.

Anton Bruckner in 1860

Anton Bruckner in 1860

ANTON BRUCKNER (1824-1896)
Abendklänge (1866)

Daniel Phillips, violin; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano

Marc tells Kerry how he discovered this short sketch by Bruckner, which is about sunset and lasts "less time than the orchestra takes to tune in a symphony."

 

Plaque of Anton Bruckner

 

Picture of sunset
What would music sound like that describes this arrival of evening?

 

Leica Camera: Bruckner Edition
There's a Leica camera named for this composer...of course there is.

 

Anne-Marie McDermott and Bach

Read more about Anne Marie McDermott.

 

Daniel Phillips plays the 1st movement of Winter from Vivaldi's 4 Seasons

Violinist Daniel Phillips enjoys a versatile career as an established chamber musician, solo artist and teacher. When he's not performing he is Professor of Violin at the Aaron Copland School of Music.

Walter Braunfels 1902

Walter Braunfels 1902

WALTER BRAUNFELS (1882-1954)
String Quintet in F-sharp Minor, Op. 63 (1944-45)

  • Allegro
  • Adagio
  • Scherzo: Vivace energico
  • Finale-Rondo: Lento
  • Allegro moderato
  • Tempo di Rondo

Giora Schmidt, violin; Jennifer Frautschi, violin; Lily Francis, viola; Sophie Shao, cello; Nicholas Canellakis, cello

 

In this unedited excerpt from their conversation, Marc and Kerry discuss the SFCMF's presentation of Walter Braunfel's String Quintet in F-sharp Minor.

 

The ARC Ensemble of the Royal Academy of Music in Toronto has just released a CD on Sony Masterworks of their performance of the Braunfels Quintet.
The ARC Ensemble of the Royal Academy of Music in Toronto has just released a CD on Sony Masterworks of their performance of the Braunfels Quintet. (Click for a larger view)

 

A SENSE OF EXILE is not always accompanied by geographical displacement. For those who failed to fulfill the Nazis' racial requirements, Germany itself presented an exile of sorts, as institutionalized intolerance, legalized discrimination and the incremental withdrawal of rights meant that it was possible to observe a familiar life without actually being able to participate in it. Such was the case for Walter Braunfels, a composer who lived in Germany through the war although his music was banned.

- Simon Wynberg, Artistic Director, ARC Ensemble

 

Marc tells Kerry that he first heard of Braunfels at a concert where his holocaust work, Through Roses was also performed. 'Great gift," he says of discovering this unknown composer.

 

Commissioned by New York's 92nd Street Y, Marc Neikrug's Through Roses portrays the musical flashbacks of Carl Stern, a Jewish violinist and Holocaust survivor who had been forced to perform for the Nazis at Auschwitz - watching as others, including his wife, were marched to their deaths. Now, as he reconciles his past, Stern, alone in a nursing home, becomes a prisoner of his own overwhelming memories.

Through Roses with Saul Rubinek – behind the scenes documentary

Walter Braunfels

Walter Braunfels

Find more about Through Roses at G. Schirmer and Chester Novello.

Read much more about Walter Braunfels.

Read more about the time and place, and the internal exile of German composers during WWII.

About the musicians...

The Cello Case

A short film with original score by Nick Canellakis. Synopsis: In the middle of the night, an obsessed cellist cannot sleep.

Additional Information