Attending live concerts increases life expectancy, improves well-being more than yoga, dog-walking, study finds

By Stephen Raskauskas |

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Sydney Symphony Orchestra on the Concert Hall Stage, 2015. [Photo: Robert Catto]

Sydney Symphony Orchestra on the Concert Hall Stage, 2015. [Photo: Robert Catto]

A new study conducted by O2, a company which owns some of United Kingdom’s largest music venues, and Patrick Fagan claims that attending live concerts can help increase life expectancy and improve overall well-being.

Fagan, who is an associate lecturer a Goldsmith University specializing in behavioral science, said, “Our research showcases the profound impact gigs have on feelings of health, happiness and wellbeing – with fortnightly or regular attendance being the key. Combining all of our findings with O2’s research, we arrive at a prescription of a gig a fortnight which could pave the way for almost a decade more years of life.”

The study conducted psychometric and heart-rate tests with participants who attended concerts, practiced yoga, and walked dogs. Those who attended concerts felt a 21% increase in well-being – compared to 10% for yoga and 7% for dog-walking – with a 25% increased feeling of self-worth, a 25% increased feeling of closeness to others, and 75% increased mental stimulation.

Considering, however, that the findings of this study have not been published in a peer-reviewed journal, we aren’t necessarily expecting to live forever based upon our current concert-going habits.

The only information we have about this study comes from a press release published on O2’s website. Instead of presenting even an abstract of the study, let alone any details about their materials and methods, we get a prepared statement from Nina Bibby, the chief marketing officer for O2:

“We all know just how good it is seeing your favorite band or artist live, but now we have the proof. Life doesn’t come with catch up and through Priority Tickets, O2 customers have access to over 5,000 live shows in more than 350 venues across the UK every year.”

Luckily, we don’t need science to convince us to attend more live music.