Through the Eyes of Women: Protests and Racial Justice in the Studs Terkel Radio Archive

Our picture of the past is often incomplete: though long on the frontlines in the fight for racial justice, women’s stories have often been left out of history. Here are nine conversations with women to enrich our understanding.

From the Studs Terkel Radio Archive: 7 Conversations with Poets for National Poetry Month

Throughout his 52 years at WFMT, Studs Terkel showcased and championed poets from across the globe.

9 Works by Women Writers We Want to See Adapted into Operas

We’re glad to see that in recent decades, more and more works by women writers have been given their due in the opera house. Here’s a look back at some of them, and a short list of works by women that we’re waiting to see operatically staged.

Choreographer Cathy Marston and the Joffrey Ballet Take ‘Jane Eyre’ From Page To Stage

To conceal that the book’s author was a woman, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre was first published in 1847 under a pen name. Choreographer Cathy Marston feels the book was revolutionary: “It truly was groundbreaking for a woman to write about her emotions and station in life with such honesty.”

‘I Like to Take on Projects That Terrify Me’: Jake Heggie on Adapting ‘Moby-Dick’ into an Opera

Moby-Dick is a Great American Novel, no doubt. But that fact doesn’t make Herman Melville’s 600+ page opus any less intimidating. For readers who got stuck somewhere in the middle of the colossal work (we can’t blame you if you were discouraged by the lengthy section of whale taxonomies), you can still join Ahab, the Pequod, and of course, the …